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Amateur Radio Payloads Share Ride with Soil Moisture Monitoring Satellite:

Amateur Radio Payloads Share Ride with Soil Moisture Monitoring Satellite:

from

The ARRL Letter

on
February 5, 2015

Website:

http://www.arrl.org/

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Amateur Radio Payloads Share Ride with Soil Moisture Monitoring Satellite:

Four NASA Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNA-X

http://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/ELaNa-X-Factsheet-508%281%29.pdf)

CubeSats carrying Amateur Radio payloads launched successfully January
31 from California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base. The primary
payload for a Delta II launcher was a Soil Moisture Active
Passive (SMAP

http://smap.jpl.nasa.gov/observatory/specifications/)

satellite. The SMAP on-board radar will share Amateur Radio spectrum at
1.26 GHz. Amateur Radio is delegate on a 23 centimeter band, which
covers 1240 to 1300 MHz.

“This is a good instance of a concordant pity partner,” ARRL CEO
David Sumner, K1ZZ, observed. “Any division to amateur
communication in a rope will be brief as a satellite passes
overhead.”

SMAP and a 4 CubeSats all deployed successfully. The research
CubeSats, launched on interest of universities, will downlink their
telemetry on a 70 centimeter band. The CubeSats and their downlink
frequencies (modes) are:

Firebird II FU3

437.405 MHz (19k2 FSK)

Firebird we FU4

437.230 MHz (19k2 FSK)

GRIFEX

http://exploration.engin.umich.edu/blog/

437.485 MHz (9k6 FSK)

ExoCube (CP-10)

http://polysat.calpoly.edu/launched-missions/cp10-exocube/

437.270 MHz (9k6 FSK)

The GRIFEX satellite is a University of Michigan project, in
cooperation with JPL, while ExoCube (CP-10) is a space weather
satellite grown by a California Polytechnic State University-San
Luis Obispo and a University of Wisconsin in partnership with NASA, and
sponsored by a National Science Foundation. The FIREBIRD

https://directory.eoportal.org/web/eoportal/satellite-missions/f/firebird

program is a collaborative CubeSat space continue goal of two
CubeSats designed and grown by Montana State University, the
University of New Hampshire, The Aerospace Corporation, and Los Alamos
National Laboratories — a FIREBIRD consortium. The FIREBIRD mission
is also saved by a NSF.

SMAP carries a “synthetic orifice radar.” The L rope (1.26 GHz) radar
is designed to magnitude backscatter off a Earth’s surface. The amount
of backscatter returned to a radar changes with a volume of
moisture in a soil. RF pulses during this magnitude are reduction influenced by
weather or by a assuage foliage cover. The satellite is
approximately 425 miles adult in a near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit. SMAP
also includes a radiometer handling during 1.41 GHz to magnitude naturally
occurring RF appetite given off by Earth’s surface.

Source:

The ARRL Letter

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