Home / Health / Target to mislay some in-house herbal brands

Target to mislay some in-house herbal brands

New York Investigation Findings

GNC:

Six “Herbal Plus” code herbal supplements per store were purchased and analyzed: Ginkgo Biloba, St. John’s Wort, Ginseng, Garlic, Echinacea, and Saw Palmetto. Purchased from 4 locations with deputy stores in Binghamton, Harlem, Plattsburgh Suffolk.
Only one addition consistently tested for a labeled contents: Garlic. One bottle of Saw Palmetto tested certain for containing DNA from a saw palmetto plant, while 3 others did not. The remaining 4 addition forms yielded churned results, though nothing suggested DNA from a labeled herb.
Of 120 DNA tests run on 24 bottles of a herbal products purchased, DNA matched tag marker 22% of a time.
Contaminants identified enclosed asparagus, rice, primrose, alfalfa/clover, spruce, ranuncula, houseplant, allium, legume, saw palmetto, and Echinacea.

 

Target:

Six “Up Up” code herbal supplements per store were purchased and analyzed: Ginkgo Biloba, St. John’s Wort, Valerian Root, Garlic, Echinacea, and Saw Palmetto. Purchased from 3 locations with deputy stores in Nassau County, Poughkeepsie, and Syracuse.
Three supplements showed scarcely unchanging participation of a labeled contents: Echinacea (with one illustration identifying rice), Garlic, and Saw Palmetto. The remaining 3 supplements did not suggested DNA from a labeled herb.
Of 90 DNA tests run on 18 bottles of a herbal products purchased, DNA matched tag marker 41% of a time.
Contaminants identified enclosed allium, French bean, asparagus, pea, furious carrot and saw palmetto.

 

Walgreens:

Six “Finest Nutrition” code herbal supplements per store were purchased and analyzed: Ginkgo Biloba, St. John’s Wort, Ginseng, Garlic, Echinacea, and Saw Palmetto. Purchased from 3 locations with deputy stores in Brooklyn, Rochester and Watertown.
Only one addition consistently tested for a labeled contents: Saw Palmetto. The remaining 5 supplements yielded churned results, with one illustration of garlic display suitable DNA. The other bottles yielded no DNA from a labeled herb.
Of a 90 DNA exam run on 18 bottles of herbal products purchased, DNA matched tag illustration 18% of a time.
Contaminants identified enclosed allium, rice, wheat, palm, daisy, and dracaena (houseplant).

 

Walmart:

Six “Spring Valley” code herbal supplements per store were purchased and analyzed: Ginkgo Biloba, St. John’s Wort, Ginseng, Garlic, Echinacea, and Saw Palmetto. Purchased from 3 geographic locations with deputy stores in Buffalo, Utica and Westchester.
None of a supplements tested consistently suggested DNA from a labeled herb. One bottle of garlic had a minimal display of garlic DNA, as did one bottle of Saw Palmetto. All remaining bottles unsuccessful to furnish DNA verifying a labeled herb.
Of a 90 DNA exam run on 18 bottles of herbal products purchased, DNA matched tag illustration 4% of a time.
Contaminants identified enclosed allium, pine, wheat/grass, rice mustard, citrus, dracaena (houseplant), and cassava (tropical tree root).

Article source: http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/business/aroundregion/story/2015/feb/12/target-remove-some-in-house-herbal-brands/287926/

Scroll To Top