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Tea tasting during Lipton’s initial factory
Dominic Sansoni for The Wall Street Journal

SRI LANKA SEEMS to be during a tipping point. Five years after a finish of a quarter-century-long polite war, tourists are being lured behind to Sri Lanka by accessible locals and an contentment of healthy and synthetic beauty. This petite island nation—totaling only 25,000 block miles though including a 4.5 million-resident city of Colombo—offers all from leopard safaris and surfing to ancient temples and formidable curries. Here, 4 practice that would be challenging, if not impossible, to find anywhere else.

1. See where Lipton started.

Sir Thomas Lipton

’s Ceylon tea association has a roots in Haputale, a city in Sri Lanka’s cloudy Hill Country. In 1890 a Scottish businessman bought plantations there and began shipping a leaves that fueled an sovereignty behind to England. Day tours by Colombo-based association Trekurious start with a Champagne brunch in a ancestral planter’s bungalow, followed by a revisit to Lipton’s initial factory, still in use. Learn to bravery tea leaves from underbrush and finish with a crater of tea during “Lipton’s Seat,” where Sir Thomas meditated, gazing out over a sprouting hills. $100 a person, trekurious.com



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Lamprais from a Dutch Burgher Union
Dominic Sansoni for The Wall Street Journal



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Using a woven shaft basket called a nambuwa, visitors (and prospectors) differentiate H2O by hand.
Dominic Sansoni for The Wall Street Journal

2. Feast on curry with Dutch Burghers. A bequest of Sri Lanka’s Dutch colonists and their descendants (known as Dutch Burghers), lamprais is a singly Sri Lankan dish. Wrapped in a banana leaf, this savoury multiple of rice, pig and beef curry, shrimp paste, sweet-onion penchant and meatballs is served around a country. But a Dutch Burgher Union, a dusty, windy members bar built a century ago, dishes adult Colombo’s best in a complicated cafe. Ordering a day in allege is advised. 114 Reid Ave., Colombo, dutchburgherunion.org

3. Pan for sapphires. Sri Lanka is a obvious source of high-quality changed stones. Hidden in a bottom of a Ellawala River nearby a city of Eheliyagoda, 50 miles from Colombo, are blue sapphires, rubies, garnets and aquamarines. Using a woven shaft basket called a nambuwa, visitors (and prospectors) differentiate H2O by hand. Alternatively, stand into a 10-meter-deep sand array to remove some (hopefully) jewel-studded dirt. From $270 for dual people, including a stay during a internal agriturismo, ampersandtravel.com

4. Visit a Buddha’s tooth. Traveling to a Kandy Kingdom to find a Buddha’s tooth sounds like a children’s anticipation adventure, though it’s a outing each Sri Lankan Buddhist hopes to make during slightest once. The vestige is kept in a rhythmical church formidable in Kandy, a executive city that was a collateral of a final Sinhalese kingdom. The tooth is pronounced to have been seized from a Buddha’s wake inferno in 543 B.C., and, according to Buddhist tradition, a resident has a boundless right to order Sri Lanka. Palace Square, Kandy